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Posts tagged ‘H1B visas’

Why Allowing H1B Spouses to Work May Only Increase the Tech Gender Divide

Ironically, allowing H1B spouses to work in the U.S. might only exacerbate the gender divide in the U.S. computer technology industry. The White House recently released a statement that proposed giving work visas to spouses of H1B visa recipients.

As it stands now, the H1B visa program, or the program that allows high-skilled temporary workers entrance to the U.S., does not provide a work visa for recipients’ spouses. Spouses currently can get a student visa, but unless they are on their own work visa, they legally cannot work.

We have heard that this will make the already highly demanded visa even more desirable, especially for computer technology workers. AIER’s latest Research Brief, H1B Jobs: Filling the Skill Gap, showed that computer technology requests make up the lion’s share (70%) of H1B petitions.

Marital Status

Source: AIER Analysis of Ruggles, Alexander, Genadek, Goeken, Schroeder, and Sobek. Integrated Public Use Microdata Series: Version 5.0 [Machine-readable database]. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, 2010.

What will this mean for H1B visa holders? AIER’s analysis from 2010-2012 Census data shows that in the computer technology industry, there are larger shares of H1B men that report being unmarried compared to U.S. citizen men: 74% of H1B men are unmarried, compared to only 6% of U.S. citizen men.

But many H1B females in computer technology are married. 76% of H1B females are married, compared to 58% of U.S. citizen females in that field.

Right now, H1B women have the highest rates of educational attainment in the U.S. computer technology industry (94% have a college degree or higher), but they make up the smallest share of H1B holders in the industry (22%).

It is safe to assume that allowing spouses of H1B visa holders to work will increase the numbers of married applicants. But since the majority of H1B women are already married, this policy might only further exacerbate the gender disparity among H1B visa holders as more men than women apply.

[Photo: DailyTech.com]

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